USDA ACCESSION NO.: 21014

SELECTION: Selected in the German Hall assigned in 1970.

METHOD RECEIVED: Rhizomes

AVAILABILITY: No restrictions, commercial variety

REFERENCES: USDA Annual Report on Hop Investigations for 1970, pp.11-12.

Romanko, R.R. 1973. In: Steiner's Guide to American Hops, S.S. Steiner, Inc., New York, NY, pp. 31-33.

Kohlmann, Hans, and Alfred Kastner. Der Hopfen. Hopfenverlag Wolnzach, Germany. 1975. p. 34.

MATURITY: Early

LEAF COLOR: Light green

SEX: Female

DISEASES: Downy Mildew: moderately susceptible

Verticillium wilt: very susceptible

Viruses: unknown

VIGOR: Poor to good

YIELD: Low (about 800 lbs/acre)

SIDEARM LENGTH: 12 inches

ALPHA ACIDS: 3-5%. ( 12 year range: 3.3 to 5.5%)

BETA ACIDS: 4.4%. (12 year range: 3.3 to 5.6%)

COHUMULONE: 20%

STORAGE STABILITY: Fair to poor (retained 55% of original alpha acids at 6 months room temperature storage)

OIL: 0.8 ml/100 g; Humulene 35.7%; caryophyllene 10.4%; myrcene 36.0% Farnesene trace; H/C ratio = 3.42

MAJOR TRAITS: Highly aromatic. Valued worldwide for its noble aroma characteristics as a fine finishing hop for super premium beers.

OTHER INFORMATION: Extreme susceptibility to Verticillium wilt and low yield potential caused steady decline of this hop in the Hallertau, the major German hop growing area. The old Hallertauer mittelfruh has practically disappeared from commercial production, but the trade has accepted a relatively new selection, Hallertauer Gold, as a partial substitute. Not grown commercially in the United States except in a new planting (about 500 acres) of virusfree Hallertauer m.f. near Bonners Ferry, ID. (Ref. A.Haunold. Travel Report to Anheuser Busch Inc., July 1991, 4 pp.).



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