USDA ACCESSION NO.: 21115

SELECTION: Selected as a somatic mutation in a commercial field of Talisman (USDA 65101)

GENUS: Humulus

SPECIES: lupulus

CULTIVAR: Pocket Talisman

PEDIGREE: Like Talisman (USDA 65101), some similarity to Cluster

PRIMARY SITE: USDA World Hop Cultivar Collection, OSU East Farm

ORIGIN: Selected by R.R. Romanko from a commercial field of Talisman in Idaho in the early 1970's

DATE RECEIVED: Spring 1976

METHOD RECEIVED: Rhizomes

AVAILABILITY: No restrictions, publicly released variety

REFERENCES: Romanko, R.R., J.C. Shepard, S.T. Likens, and G.B. Nickerson. Registration of Pocket Talisman (Registration No. 4), Crop Sci 16:310. 1976.

Romanko, R.R. In: Steiner's Guide to American Hops, first edition 1973, pp. 29-30. Talisman-Tl.

MATURITY: Late

LEAF COLOR: Light green

SEX: Female

DISEASES: Downy Mildew: tolerant

Verticillium wilt: unknown, probably tolerant

Viruses: unknown

VIGOR: Good to poor

YIELD: Medium to poor

SIDEARM LENGTH: 12-24 inches

ALPHA ACIDS: 6%

BETA ACIDS: 3.2%

COHUMULONE: 55%

STORAGE STABILITY: Good

OIL: 0.63 ml/100 g, H/C 1.09, very low in humulene (below 5% of the oil), very high myrcene (65-70%)

MAJOR TRAITS: Substantially reduced internode length (about one half of Talisman) and thought to be suitable as dwarf hop to be grown on a low trellis. Ruffled, unattractive cone type with very long tracts and bracteoles that are twisted irregularly. Rhizomes have a large number of buds similar to crown gall infection in visual appearance but buds often fail to grow even under ideal conditions, and therefore this hop is extremely difficult toestablish under field conditions.

OTHER INFORMATION: Originally thought to have exceptionally high yield potential (up to 3000 lbs/acre) which failed to materialize under commercial conditions. It takes up to 3 years to establish a yard since rhizomes often fail to grow. Alpha acids content generally lower than that of Talisman (USDA 65101). This hop has never been grown commercially, except for a 1-acre demonstration plot near Parma, ID in the 1970's where each hill was 4-strung and produced and excellent yield.

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